Featured Articles

Enzymes: What they are – What they do – Why you might care

Enzymes act as catalysts - molecules that make reactions happen faster. While there are enzymes that help to build things up, in this article I’ll focus on enzymes that help to break things down, a.k.a. digestive enzymes.

Digestive enzymes are an incredibly important part of our gastrointestinal system. They help to break chemical bonds in foods, transforming large molecules into smaller molecules we can easily absorb. That’s what digestion means - breaking down into smaller parts.

Each enzyme in our bodies is made to fit like a lock and key with its particular substrate; the “substrate” being the thing the enzyme reacts with and transforms.

In the above picture, you can imagine that the yellow substrate is the complex carbohydrate molecule sucrose, in which case the green enzyme would be called sucrase. The blue and red products at the end of this particular reaction would be glucose and fructose molecules, because those are the two simpler sugar molecules that sucrose is made from – and the enzyme sucrase helped to break the bond that held them together.

Note: All enzymes end with the suffix –ase. For instance, the enzyme that helps break down lactose is called lactase. For peptides, it’s peptidase; for lipids, it’s lipase; etc.

We have hydrochloric acid in our stomachs to help start the digestion of large proteins, but that just gets the ball rolling. Enzymes are required to break proteins down fully into amino acids, which happens lower down in the small intestine. The breakdown of fats and carbohydrates also happens there. Although we do have some enzymes in our saliva to help kick start the digestion of carbohydrates, the vast majority of digestive enzymes are released into the small intestine by the pancreas, or are created within the small intestine itself.

Remember I said enzymes are catalysts that make reactions happenContinue Reading >

Love Your Heart and It Will Love You Back!

Love Your Heart and It Will Love You Back!

February is a month filled with hope, love and lots of Valentine hearts. It also happens to be the month designated to heart health awareness. Many of you may not realize that heart disease is actually the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States. Fortunately, it also is a condition that responds very advantageously to healthy changes that in turn provide prevention of heart diseases.Continue Reading

Anti-Aging with Cosmetic Acupuncture

Anti-Aging with Cosmetic Acupuncture

Acupuncture is a form Chinese Medicine, over 2,500 years old, that promotes healing and rejuvenation in the body. Acupuncture is growing more and more popular, both in mainstream society and medical research, for its efficacy in treating conditions such as pain, insomnia, headaches, and a huge list of other ailments. The term anti-aging isn’t quite correct, more like aging mitigation.Continue Reading

Cervical Cancer & HPV

Cervical Cancer & HPV

Have you known someone affected by cervical cancer or HPV? Do you know that there are ways to support your health and help reduce risk of cervical cancer? January is Cervical Health Awareness Month and in honor of that, we want to offer information and tips to help support our patients.Continue Reading

Developing Childhood Immunity - Microbes, Not Antibiotics

Developing Childhood Immunity - Microbes, Not Antibiotics

It's that time of year again. The time of year where everyone starts catching flus and colds. Hand sanitizers and antibiotics are generally overused, but around this time of year they are particularly. Antibiotics are one of the most misused medications and this has contributed to the emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria. Many child doctor visits end with an antibiotic prescription for a viral infection.Continue Reading